10th of 130 works found
Eagles
Title
Eagles
Artist
Bilawich, Sandra
Date
2005
Medium
steel
soil
plants
Type
eco-sculpture
Owner
City of Burnaby
Accession Number
NA
Location
Kensington and Sprott
Central Park
Category
City of Burnaby Community Art
Collection
Public Art
Bruce Voyce and Sandra Bilawich created 10 eagles for the World Police and Fire Games in 2009. Eagles, the Games’ emblem, represent power, knowledge, prestige, friendship, and peace. They are located in Central Park and along Kensington Ave. between Joe Sakic Way and Sprott Street. Eco-sculpture is a modern form of horticulture also known as “topiary.” Rather than relying on stone and chisel, eco-sculptors create art from nature. Recognizing a unique opportunity, the City of Burnaby is taking the lead in bringing eco-sculpture to the West Coast through installations and workshops. Appealing to all age groups but particularly to children, eco-sculpture is not only fun and educational, it’s perfect for drawing attention to environmental issues. In addition, these living, 3-D sculptures have enormous tourism potential for the city, all of which explains why the program has been greeted with keen interest by a broad range of partners. The Burnaby eco-sculpture program gratefully acknowledges the generous support and commitment of the following partners: Greater Vancouver Regional District’s Sustainable Enterprise Fund, VanCity Savings Credit Union, VanCity VISA, Canada Lands Company, Byrne Creek Streamkeepers, and Stream of Dreams Murals Society.
Sandra Bilawich is a Vancouver-based sculptor known for her unique approach to the medium. She was born in Saskatchewan in 1963 and raised in Whitehorse, Yukon, from 1970 onwards. Sandra cites her high school art teacher—renowned artist Ted Harrison—as well as her grandmother—accomplished folk artist Ann Harbuz—as her original inspiration. Introduced to stone carving in 1991, Sandra opened an independent art studio, Elemental Designs, in 1994. To date, she has carved a number of stone, steel, and wooden sculptures which can be found in public and private collections across Canada, Europe, Japan, and the United States.